KNOW YOUR RIGHTS DURING A TRAFFIC STOP!!!

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TrafficTicket

I was recently given some information that I felt would be of great benefit to those that don’t know the procedure when getting pulled over. Most of this information is available on Flexyourrights.org.

PROTECT YOUR RIGHTS DURING A TRAFFIC STOP

In any given traffic stop, with a few notable exceptions, the below rules will help protect your civil rights and improve your chances of driving away safely—so you don’t have to be a legal expert to say and do the right thing.
Outline:
I. Keep Your Private Items Out of View
II. Be Courteous and Non-Confrontational
III. Just Say “No” to Warrantless Searches
IV. Determine if You Can Leave
V. Do Not Answer Questions Without Your Lawyer Present
VI. Do Not Physically Resist

1) Keep Your Private Items Out of View
Always keep any private items that you don’t want others to see out of sight. Legally speaking, police do not need a search warrant in order to confiscate any illegal items that are in plain view.
Probable cause Doctrine:
a) Many factors contribute to a police officer’s level of authority in a given situation. Understanding the what, when, why, and how of police conduct during a stop is confusing for most people. Varying standards of proof exist to justify varying levels of police authority during citizen contacts. An understanding of these standards will help the citizen understand when police can surpass constitutional protections.
b) Reasonable suspicion Facts or circumstances which would lead a reasonable person to suspect that a crime has been, is being, or will be committed
i. At this stage, police may detain the suspect for a brief period and perform a frisk. In some cases, drug-sniffing dogs may be called to the scene, although officers must cite a reason for suspecting the presence of drug evidence in particular. Refusing a search does not create reasonable suspicion, although acting nervous and answering questions inconsistently can. For this reason, it is BEST NOT to answer questions if you have to lie in order to do so. Police authority increases if they catch you in a lie, but not if you refuse to answer questions. As a general rule, reasonable suspicion applies to situation in which police have reason to believe you’re up to something, but they don’t know what it is.
c) Probable cause Facts or evidence that would lead a reasonable person to believe that a crime has been, is being, or will be committed and the person arrested is responsible
i. At this stage, police may perform a search, and often an arrest. Probable cause generally means police know what crime they suspect you of and have discovered evidence to support that belief. Common examples include seeing or smelling evidence which is in plain view, or receiving an admission of guilt for a specific crime.
ii. For the conscientious citizen, the best advice regarding police authority is to stick to your guns and not waive your constitutional rights under any circumstances. Police officers will often give misleading descriptions of what their authority is, but you have nothing to gain by submitting to coercive police tactics. Asserting your rights properly is good way to avoid arrest, but it is an even better way to avoid a conviction.

2) Be Courteous & Non-Confrontational
If you are pulled over, the first thing you should to do is turn your car off, turn the dome light on (if it’s nighttime), roll down the front-window, and keep your hands on the steering wheel. Don’t immediately reach into your glove compartment for your license and registration. Officers want to be able to see your hands for their own safety. Wait until the officer asks to see your paperwork before retrieving your documents.
The first thing you should say to the officer is, “Hello officer. Can you tell me why I am being pulled over?” The officer may give you a hard time or say, “Why do you think I pulled you over?” Tell the officer you don’t know. Most importantly, do not apologize after you get stopped, because that can be considered an admission of guilt and could be used against you later in court.
Show your identification if it’s requested. Be respectful and non-confrontational. Refer to the police as “Sir,” “Ma’am,” or “Officer.” Remain calm and quiet while the officer is reviewing your documents. If the officer writes you a ticket, accept it quietly and never complain (if a ticket is the least of your worries). Listen to any instruction on paying the fine or contesting the ticket, and drive away slowly.
3) Just Say “No” to Warrantless Searches
Warning: If a police officer asks your permission to search, you are under no obligation to consent. The only reason he’s asking you is because he doesn’t have enough evidence to search without your consent. If you consent to a search request you give up one of the most important constitutional rights you have—your Fourth Amendment protection against unreasonable searches and seizures.
4th Amendment: The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. (Wikipedia.org)
A majority of avoidable police searches occur because citizens naively waive their Fourth Amendment rights by consenting to warrantless searches. As a general rule, if a person consents to a warrantless search, the search automatically becomes reasonable and therefore legal. Consequently, whatever an officer finds during such a search can be used to convict the person.
Don’t expect a police officer to tell you about your right not to consent. Police officers are not required by law to inform you of your rights before asking you to consent to a search. In addition, police officers are trained to use their authority to get people to consent to a search, and most people are predisposed to comply with any request a police officer makes. For example, the average motorist stopped by a police officer who asks them, “Would you mind if I search your vehicle, please?” will probably consent to the officer’s search without realizing that they have every right to deny the officer’s request.
If, for any reason you don’t want the officer digging through your belongings, you should refuse to consent by saying something like, “Officer, I know you want to do your job, but I do not consent to any searches of my private property.” If the officer still proceeds to search you and finds illegal contraband, your attorney can argue that the contraband was discovered through an illegal search and hence should be thrown out of court.
You should never hesitate to assert your constitutional rights. Just say “no!”
4) Determine if You Can Leave
You have the right to terminate an encounter with a police officer unless you are being detained under police custody or have been arrested. The general rule is that you don’t have to answer any questions that the police ask you. This rule comes from the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which protects you against self-incrimination. If you cannot tell if you are allowed to leave, say to the officer, “I have to be on my way. Am I free to go?”
If the officer says “Yes,” tell him to have a nice day, and leave immediately. If the officer’s answer is ambiguous, or if he asks you another unrelated question, persist by asking “am I being detained, or can I go now?” If the officer says “No,” you are being detained, and you may be placed under arrest. If this is the case, reassert your rights as outlined above, and follow Rules #5 and #6.
5) Do Not Answer Questions without Your Attorney Present
There is no reason to worry that your failure to answer the officer’s questions will later be used against you. The truth is just the opposite: Anything you say can, and probably will, be used against you.
In just about any case imaginable, a person is best off not answering any questions about his involvement in anything illegal. Assert your Fifth and Sixth Amendment rights by saying these exact words: “Officer, I have nothing to say until I speak with a lawyer.”
*Remember- If you do choose to answer any of the officer’s questions, always be honest. If you feel it is best not to answer truthfully, then don’t say anything at all.
6) Do Not Physically Resist
If the police proceed to detain, search, or arrest you despite your wishes—do not physically resist. You may state clearly but non-confrontationally: “Officer, I am not resisting arrest and I do NOT consent to any searches.” Or you may assert your rights by simply saying nothing until you can speak with an attorney.
Information from www.flexyourrights.org

5 Comments

  1. Hello:

    I respectfully disagree with the statement that “telling the officer “I don’t know” when he [or she] asks why you were pulled over is reason enough for him to determine that you were just ignorant of your speed and the posted limit, you just gave yourself a ticket.”

    In the original post, the conversation went as such:

    “Hello officer, Can you tell me why I am being pulled over?” The officer may give you a hard time or say, “WHY DO YOU THINK I PULLED YOU OVER?”

    Response: Tell the officer, “You don’t know” because it is not your job to enforce traffic violations. Ladies and gentlemen, please do not fall into the trap of incriminating yourself. Do NOT give the officer more information than is needed as if such disclosure will persuade the officer to give you a break because you were honest with him or her.

    I think the aforementioned comment would be more relevant if the officer asks, “DO YOU KNOW HOW FAST YOU WERE GOING (traveling/driving)?” Then, by asserting that you do not know will illustrate that you were ignorant of your speed and the posted limit, and may place you at a disadvantage if you attempt to challenge the ticket in court.

    Readers of Alleyesonwho.com, there is a diminished expectation of privacy in automobiles. (Point Blank) The Supreme Court has repeatedly created warrantless car search exceptions to the Fourth Amendment of the United States Constitution that provide great deference to the authority of police officers. The Carroll Doctrine grants an automatic automobile search exception that authorizes warrantless searches where the officers have probable cause to believe that there was contraband or other evidence of criminal activity in the vehicle. In addition, the Court will believe an officer’s testimony during a traffic stop unless there is “extrinsic evidence to contradict the [officer’s] story other than [driver’s] own testimony.” U.S. v. Heath (1995) Basically, if the determination comes down to the credibility of the officer’s words versus your own then you will lose unless you can truly prove that the officer is lying. The Court will even ignore common sense logic that says drug dealers will not ride around with kilograms of cocaine in their lap during a traffic stop for the officer to see these bricks in plain view. In conclusion, the right of privacy in an automobile is quite limited; therefore, to protect the privacy of all American citizens please know your rights during a traffic stop as it will help deter police misconduct and enhance the rights bestowed on all American citizens by the United States Constitution.

    The Fourth Amendment: The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

  2. Telling the officer “I don’t know” when he asks why you were pulled over is reason enough for him to determine that you were just ignorant of your speed and the posted limit, you just gave yourself a ticket. Do not answer anything aside from “Am I being detained?” “I do not consent to unreasonable searches of my vehicle or person” and “Am I free to go” anything else can and will get you in deeper shit.

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